SOT Webinars Scheduled for November and December 2019

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SOT Component Groups (Regional Chapters, Special Interest Groups, and Specialty Sections) and Committees host webinars throughout the year. Webinars are an effective distance-learning method intended to impart scientific knowledge to members of each group as well as the SOT membership at large. These webinars are just one of the many benefits of SOT membership.

Upcoming webinars for November and December 2019 are listed here.

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Award Webinar Series: 2019 Graduate Student and Postdoctoral Awards

Host: Molecular and Systems Biology Specialty Section (MSBSS)
Date and Time: Monday, November 4, 2019, 12:00 Noon–1:00 PM (ET)

Registration is required.

This webinar will highlight the research of the 2019 MSBSS award recipients. This year, we acknowledge exceptional research related to targeting renal proliferation to combat acute kidney injury, estrogen as a modulator of the microbiome, and hepatic transcriptomics following prenatal exposures. These three outstanding early-career scientists will share their work during this one-hour webinar:

  • MSBSS Paper of the Year Award
    • Maria Monteiro, Harvard Medical School
    • A High-Throughput Screen Identifies DYRK1A Inhibitor ID-8 That Stimulates Human Kidney Tubular Epithelial Cell Proliferation
  • MSBSS Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award
    • Tara Catron, US EPA
    • Estradiol Exposure Disrupts the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis during Zebrafish Development
  • MSBSS Graduate Student Research Award
    • Kari Neier, University of Michigan
    • Reprogramming of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Target Genes in Mice Perinatally Exposed to Phthalates

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Chemical Carcinogenicity Revisited in Three Parts

Host: Risk Assessment Specialty Section (RASS)
Date and Time: Wednesday, November 13, 2019, 3:00 PM–4:00 PM (ET)

Registration is not required.

  • Part 1: A Unified Theory of Carcinogenicity Based on Contemporary Knowledge
    • Douglas C. Wolf, DVM
      Syngenta Crop Protection LLC
      Greensboro, NC
  • Part 2: Current Knowledge of Carcinogenesis Shows That Categorization as a Carcinogen or Noncarcinogen Is Not Scientifically Credible
    • John E. Doe, PhD
      Parker Doe LLP
      Bramhall, Stockport, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • Part 3: Risk Assessment of Carcinogenic Potential Based on the Current State of Knowledge of Carcinogenesis in Humans
    • Samuel E. Cohen, PhD
      Department of Pathology and Microbiology
      Havlik-Wall Professor of Oncology
      University of Nebraska Medical Center
      Omaha, NE

Developments in the understanding of the etiology of cancer have profound implications for the way in which the carcinogenic potential of chemicals should be addressed in a testing framework and regulatory decision-making/risk management. Our enhanced understanding of carcinogenesis obligates us to develop better ways to evaluate and regulate chemicals. It is no longer appropriate to embrace the concept that chemicals are either “carcinogens” or “noncarcinogens.” The capacity to induce cancer should not be classified in an inflexible, binary manner as present (carcinogen) or absent (noncarcinogen). In this three-part presentation, we will (1) describe a unified theory of carcinogenesis; (2) present the argument that the long-term rodent bioassay is no longer appropriate or efficient for evaluating carcinogenic potential for humans and to inform risk management decisions, and that since modes of action that lead to the induction of tumors are already considered under other hazardous property categories in classification (e.g., Mutagenicity/Genotoxicity and Target Organ Toxicity), a separate category for Carcinogenicity is not required and provides no additional public health protection; and (3) propose a transition from dependence upon the long-term bioassay to a decision tree matrix that can be applied to a broader range of chemicals, with better predictivity, based on the premise that cancer is the consequence of DNA coding errors that arise either directly from mutagenic events or indirectly from sustained cell proliferation.

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Active Inclusivity in Toxicology: Part 1—Why Is Diversity Important in Science?

Host: Graduate Student Leadership Committee (GSLC)
Date and Time: Thursday, November 21, 2019, 2:30 PM–3:30 PM (ET)

Registration is required.

 The GSLC, in collaboration with the SOT Women in Toxicology (WIT), Hispanic Organization of Toxicologists (HOT), Toxicologists of African Origin (TAO) Special Interest Groups, and Committee on Diversity Initiatives (CDI), is hosting a webinar series to discuss the topic of diversity in toxicology. The series will explore issues such as unconscious bias faced by toxicologists who are members of groups underrepresented in the sciences and discuss the importance of diversity in science broadly. This series will document resources and support available in each of the relevant Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and within SOT overall.

This session will highlight the importance of cultivating diversity, equity, inclusiveness, and accessibility (DEIA). In addition, two central issues—pay gaps and talent pipeline—will be discussed, with a focus on developing solutions, offering support, and bridging communities. It also will explore what CDI is doing to increase diversity in SOT and what strategies are best to promote a racially/ethnically inclusive field. Speakers from WIT and TAO will share some basics about SOT SIGs and how to get involved.

Speakers:

  • Marquea D. King, PhD
    Director of Office of Scientific Quality Review
    US Department of Agriculture, ARS
  • Darryl B. Hood, PhD
    Associate Professor
    Ohio State University
  • Virunya Bhat, PhD
    Secretary/Treasurer
    SOT Women in Toxicology Special Interest Group

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Ethics, Opioids, and America’s Drug Overdose Crisis

Host: Ethical, Legal, Forensics, and Societal Issues Specialty Section (ELFSISS)
Date and Time: Wednesday, December 11, 2019, 1:00 PM–2:00 PM (ET)

Registration is required.

Many individuals live with pain, and opioids can treat pain. But as we now know all too well, living in the midst of an epidemic, opioids also can be deadly. How, then, are we to think of opioid medication? In this talk, Travis N. Rieder, PhD, will argue that we have to get away from thinking of opioids as either a panacea or black magic; like all drugs, they carry both risks and benefits, and responding appropriately to both require careful reasoning.

Speaker:

  • Travis N. Rieder, PhD
    Assistant Director of Education Initiatives
    Research Scholar
    Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

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Dose-Response Modeling for Risk Assessment—BMDS 3.2 and Bayesian Model Averaging

Host: Risk Assessment Specialty Section (RASS)
Date and Time: Wednesday, December 11, 2019, 3:00 PM–4:30 PM (ET)

Registration is not required.

Speakers:

  • Allen Davis, MSPH
    Cincinnati, OH
  • Jeff Gift, PhD
    US EPA/NCEA
    Research Triangle Park, NC
  • Matt Wheeler
    NIOSH
    Cincinnati, OH

This webinar will introduce participants to benchmark dose modeling and analysis, probabilistic dose-response assessment in a Bayesian framework (including distributional BMD estimation), and model averaging concepts. In particular, model averaging approaches will be highlighted, given that they have recently been suggested as a preferred approach to address modeling uncertainty in dose-response assessments. Dichotomous model averaging was implemented in BMDS 3.0, which simplified the workflow for modeling by fully implementing all BMDS analyses in Microsoft Excel. Recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) released a new version of its Benchmark Dose Software program (BMDS 3.2) that additionally implements Bayesian model averaging methods for continuous data using maximum a posteriori methods in conjunction with model weights based on the Laplace approximation. The model averaging approach for continuous data implemented in BMDS 3.2 improves on other model averaging methods by averaging not only over a model suite, but also across distributional assumptions. Historically, different organizations have a priori assumed either a normal or lognormal distribution for the continuous endpoint being modeled. However, this determination has typically been based on assumptions rather than empirical evidence. Thus, the use of distributional assumptions also has introduced uncertainty into continuous dose-response analyses. Therefore, the ability of a continuous model averaging approach to average over models and distributions accounts for both model and distributional uncertainty. Additionally, new versions of BMDS have recently been developed (1) in the R statistical programming language, and (2) online in the US EPA Health Assessment Workspace Collaboration (HAWC) interface. HAWC is the US EPA online assessment tool for extracting data and generating graphics. The R-BMDS version represents a fully customizable “research” version of BMDS, whereas HAWC-BMDS is a fully interoperable option for performing dose-response analyses online. The focus of this training will center on how to use the BMDS 3.2 Excel interface and the theory and application of the new models, particularly the model averaging methods. The new R- and HAWC-BMDS versions also will be briefly covered.

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Smoke Signals: Respiratory Toxicities of Wildfire Exposures

Host: Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section (IRSS)
Date and Time: Friday, December 13, 2019, 12:00 Noon–1:00 PM (ET)

Registration is required.

Wildfires are increasing in size and severity, with severe impacts on air quality and respiratory health. Wildfire smoke is associated with increased mortality and respiratory morbidity, including increased medication usage, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. However, the clinical impacts and molecular mechanisms are not well characterized. Therefore, defining the respiratory toxicities of wildfire exposure is critical. This webinar will introduce the epidemiological data regarding community exposures during wildfires (presented by Dr. Mary Rice), and then define the toxicological mechanisms by which wildfire smoke exposure can impact pulmonary health (presented by Dr. M. Ian Gilmour). The webinar will cover human, mouse, and in vitro studies to date.

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Transitioning to Independence Webinar Series, Part 1: Interviews with Early Career Investigators

Host: Postdoctoral Assembly
Date and Time: Monday, December 16, 2019, 3:00 PM–4:00 PM (ET)

Registration is required.

This webinar series, sponsored by the Postdoctoral Assembly (PDA), Carcinogenesis Specialty Section (CSS), and Metals Specialty Section (MSS) and endorsed by the SOT Education and Career Development Committee (ECDC), will focus on providing actionable advice on the early career transition to independence and will feature experts with diverse backgrounds—from newly-hired assistant professors to members of faculty search committees. The target audience is trainees (postdocs and graduate students), as well as early career investigators. Co-Chairs: Sarah Carratt and Pam Lein

Panelists:

  • Alessandro Venosa, PhD, University of Utah
  • Karilyn Sant, PhD, San Diego State University
  • Jamie Bernard, PhD, Michigan State University

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SOT Webinars Scheduled for November and December 2019