Call for Nominations: NASEM Standing Committee on the Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions

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By Suzanne Fitzpatrick posted 9 days ago

  

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Board on Life Sciences and Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology seeks new experts to serve on its Standing Committee on the Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions. Particularly, NASEM is looking for nominations of experts on toxicology and on risk assessment of environmental pollutant exposures. 

You can self-nominate or nominate anyone with interest and expertise in environmental health, particularly in the following areas of research or public health practice:

  • Influence of human-ecosystem interactions on human health (e.g., one health, planetary health, environmental demography)
  • Social factors that influence knowledge development and decision-making (e.g., STS studies, environmental sociology, decision science, political science)
  • Risk assessment of environmental pollutant exposures
  • Environmental health disparities and environmental justice
  • Environmental and public health policy and law

In forming the committee, NASEM seeks to include diverse volunteers with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, and other factors and also welcomes nominations for experts at different stages of their careers, including early career professionals, and from all professional sectors, such as academia, local and state government, industry, and non- or not-for-profit organizations. 

Nominations are due by Sunday, October 18, 2020, at 11:59 pm (ET).

About the NASEM Standing Committee on the Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions

Since 2008, the Emerging Science Committee has convened several workshops per year to explore new sciences, technologies, and research methodologies that could deepen understandings about the effects of the environment on human health. These workshops bring together experts in science and public policy for transdisciplinary discussion about scientific advances and how they can be used to inform personal, public health, and regulatory environmental health decisions.

The Emerging Science project is supported by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. 

This blog is being shared as part of the SOT roles and responsibilities assigned to the author based on the leadership position held. The viewpoints and expertise expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints and expertise of the listed author.

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